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Caribbean In/Securities: Creativity and Negotiation in the Caribbean

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CARISCC Research and #Art Exhibition, including #Shashamane Screening Event

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We are very pleased to announce that ‘Negotiating Caribbean In/Securities through Creativity: A Research and Art Exhibition’ will be launched at the British Library Knowledge Centre on Sunday, 25th-26th June, 2017.

The launch of this online CARISCC exhibition is taking place alongside Caribbean In/Securities and Creativity: Diasporic Dialogues, a two-day conference which speaks to the theme of Caribbean and diasporic dialogues, and the role of creativity in negotiating the in/securities surrounding such dialogues.

The event is a result of a collaboration between the Centre for Caribbean and Diaspora Studies (CCDS) at Goldsmiths, University of London, and Caribbean In/Securities: Creativity and Negotiation in the Caribbean (CARISCC), an international research network funded by the Leverhulme Trust, which seeks to explore the interactions between the precariousness of insecure livelihoods and neighbourhoods, and the negotiation of risk through creativity, in a Caribbean context.

Planned event activities include the exhibition launch, keynote speakers, artist-led discussions, research panels and paper presentations distributed across the two days.

CARISCC are very pleased to be showing a new sculptural work by award-winning artist Sonia Barrett at the exhibition launch, and on the evening of 26th June CARISCC will host a special screening of Shashamane, a film created by Giulia Amati. The screening will be followed by a panel discussion including Giulia Amati (filmmaker and winner of more than twenty awards, including the Aljazeera International Documentary Film Festival Jury’s Award), Errol Brown (brother of Ras Mweya Masimba, animation artist featured in the film), Pat Noxolo (University of Birmingham and lead investigator of CARISCC); and Ronald Cummings (Brock University, Canada, and member of the CARISCC network).

For the full CARISCC exhibition schedule, please click here.

For additional information about the film screening event and tickets, please click here.

Moviemaker Asha Lovelace (Earl’s Daughter), Joebell and America, coming to St. Martin

Source: Moviemaker Asha Lovelace (Earl’s Daughter), Joebell and America, coming to St. Martin

Call for Papers: Black Geographies

Source: Call for Papers: Black Geographies

#Caribbean In/Securities and Creativity: Diasporic Dialogues – Registration now open!

Registration now open! https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/caribbean-insecurities-and-creativity-diasporic-dialogues-tickets-34463830244

 
This two-day event will include a conference and an art and research exhibition speaking to the theme of Caribbean and diasporic dialogues where the role of creativity is highlighted in negotiating the in/securities permeating such dialogues. The Caribbean region is a crucible for everyday negotiations between security and insecurity (in/security). Indeed, Caribbean people deploy their creative energy to live with the everyday effects of poverty, inequality and violence, whilst generating globally influential creativity in political, literary, and dance cultures. The conference and exhibition will consider in/security in terms of the connections between precariousness and creativity, thus bringing a fresh focus to the study of global security. The event is a result of collaboration between the Centre for Caribbean and Diaspora Studies (CCDS) at Goldsmiths, University of London, and Caribbean In/Securities: Creativity and Negotiation in the Caribbean (CARISCC), an international research network funded by the
 
Registration fee: £40 (early bird fee £35 payable by 5 June 2017). Lunch and refreshments will be provided on both days and are included in the registration fee.
 
Please also visit the conference webpage which will be updated regularly:

History Education and Transatlantic Colonial #Slavery

History Education and Transatlantic Colonial Slavery

1 June 2017, 10:00am-5:00pm

Wilberforce Room, Museum of London in Docklands

We would like to invite you to a workshop on the 1 June 2017 at the Museum of London in Docklands focused on new approaches to teaching the history of transatlantic colonial slavery.

Transatlantic slavery and its abolition continues to be taught widely in secondary schools across Britain. This workshop is designed to give teachers and other education professionals access to current academic scholarship and new pedagogical approaches to teaching this history. The event will contribute towards building a network of educators to offer leadership for the transformation of teaching and learning about transatlantic slavery in our schools and other educational environments. This workshop will be an opportunity to share ideas and to think about the development of guidelines for effective practice and scholarship that can be available to schools in the coming year.

Registration is free and lunch and refreshments will be provided. Please book your place here:

History Education and Transatlantic Colonial Slavery<https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/history-education-and-transatlantic-colonial-slavery-tickets-34567567525>

www.eventbrite.co.uk

We would like to invite you to a workshop on the 1 June 2017 at the Museum of London in Docklands focused on new approaches to teaching the history of transatlantic colonial slavery. Transatlantic slavery and its abolition continues to be taught widely in secondary schools across Britain. This workshop is designed to give teachers and other education professionals access to current academic scholarship and new pedagogical approaches to teaching this history. The event will contribute towards building a network of educators to offer leadership for the transformation of teaching and learning about transatlantic slavery in our schools and other educational environments. This workshop will be an opportunity to share ideas and to think about the development of guidelines for effective practice and scholarship that can be available to schools in the coming year. Registration is free and lunch and refreshments will be provided.   This event is funded by the British Academy and is a partnership between the Antislave

This event is funded by the British Academy and is a partnership between the Antislavery Usable Past project (University of Nottingham), University College London-Institute of Education, Justice to History, and the Centre for the Study of the Legacies of British Slave-ownership, University College London. With generous support from the Museum of London in Docklands.

9:30-10:00       Registration (Refreshments served)

10:00-10:10     Welcome

10:10-11:10     Session 1:  Historicising Race (60 minutes)

Speaker TBC

Session focus: Political and moral dimensions of teaching about transatlantic slavery Key questions: Why should we teach about slavery and colonialism? Why should we engage with race and how should we frame the engagement? What events and historiographical debates are key to our understanding of the constitution of race over time? How and why should we acknowledge race and racism in the classroom?

11:10-11:25     Break (Refreshments served)

11:25-12:55     Session 2: Transatlantic Slavery: Pedagogical Approaches (90 minutes)

Abdul Mohamud and Robin Whitburn (Justice to History<http://www.justice2history.org/> / UCL-IOE) Session focus: The pedagogical dimensions of teaching about the transatlantic slave trade and New World colonial slavery.

Key questions: What are the pedagogical challenges of this work? How should we approach issues of empathy, race, activism and uniqueness?

12:55-13:55     Lunch (Food served)

13:55-14:55     Session 3: Legacies of British Slave-ownership (60 minutes)

Nick Draper and Rachel Lang (Centre for the Study of the Legacies of British Slave-ownership, UCL<http://www.ucl.ac.uk/lbs/>) Session focus: New historiographical developments in the field of transatlantic slavery and abolition.

Key questions: Where does slave-ownership fit into the national narrative of Britain’s involvement with transatlantic slavery? How does this research feed into current debates on slavery and its abolition? How does this shift in focus change the way we think and teach about slavery? What resources are there to support teaching about British participation in transatlantic slavery?

14:55-15:10     Break (Refreshments served)

15:10-16:40     Challenging 2007: Representation and Remembrance (90 minutes)

Local Root / Global Routes<https://lrgr14.wordpress.com/>: Toyin Agebtu (Ligali), Lucy Capes (Hackney B Six), Katie Donington (University of Nottingham), Kristy Warren (University of Nottingham), Emma Winch (Hackney Museum) Session focus: Understanding the historical, political and cultural dimensions of the role of representation and remembrance in the classroom.

Key questions: What issues are at stake in the representation of slavery (race, class, gender, nation, empire)? How can we develop strategies of representation that are both appropriate and critical? Whose voice shapes our understanding of the historical narrative? How can we include multiple voices and perspectives? Are there ways of working across institutions and disciplines that can open up new avenues of representation and remembrance?

Each 60 minute session will involve:

*   40 minute presentation by speakers

*   20 minutes audience responses

The 90 minute sessions will also involve:

*   30 minutes small group discussion around tables feeding into the development of ideas for writing a set of guiding principles for the teaching of transatlantic slavery

 

June 1 Deadline for the Haitian Studies Association Call for Papers

Source: June 1 Deadline for the Haitian Studies Association Call for Papers

Book Launch of Collected Poems of John Robert Lee

Source: Book Launch of Collected Poems of John Robert Lee

Book Launch: Go Home? The Politics of #Immigration Controversies

Monday 15th May 2017, 6.30 – 8.30pm

The Word Bookshop, 314 New Cross Road, London SE14 6AF

In July 2013, the UK government arranged for a van to drive through parts of London carrying the message ‘In the UK illegally? GO HOME or face arrest.’ This book tells the story of what happened next.

The vans were short-lived, but they were part of an ongoing trend in government-sponsored communication designed to demonstrate toughness on immigration. The authors set out to explore the effects of such performances: on policy, on public debate, on pro-migrant and anti-racist activism, and on the everyday lives of people in Britain. This book presents their findings, and provides insights into the practice of conducting research on such a charged and sensitive topic.

Dr Suzanne Hall (LSE) and Rita Chadha (Charity CEO, equalities and migration campaigner) will discuss the relevance of the book to current ideas and politics, joined by members of the author collective: Hannah Jones, Yasmin Gunaratnam, Gargi Bhattacharyya, Sukhwant Dhaliwal, William Davies, Kirsten Forkert, Emma Jackson and Roiyah Saltus.

To register your place please follow the Eventbrite link: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/book-launch-go-home-the-politics-of-immigration-controversies-tickets-34068478737?utm-medium=discovery&utm-campaign=social&utm-content=attendeeshare&aff=estw&utm-source=tw&utm-term=listing

Madwoman: New #poetry collection by Jamaican/US poet, Shara McCallum

 

madwoman flyer uk launch (1).jpg

 

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