Memory, Migration, and Decolonisation in the Caribbean and Beyond, 1804 to the Present

Institute of Latin American Studies, Senate House, School of Advanced Studies, University of London, 23rd–24th May 2017

We invite papers that interrogate the intersections between memory, migration, and decolonisation across the Caribbean and its diasporas. The conference seeks to explore how ideas about decolonisation have resonated in the Caribbean, the Americas, and Europe. We take Haitian independence

(1804) as a thinking point for debates surrounding concepts of independence, colonialisms, and freedoms. We welcome papers that explore contemporary practices of neo-colonialism and resistances to them as well as issues of formal ‘decolonisation’. We will develop themes of decolonisation by moving beyond any set discipline: we are particularly interested to hear proposals from artists, curators, musicians and community activists, as well as scholars. As part of an ongoing oral history project, this conference will feature a community-led public engagement activity that focuses on the lived experiences of decolonisation and migration amongst members of Britain’s Caribbean diaspora.

Themes of interest include (but are not limited to):

  • Memories and experiences of migration, empire, and (de)colonisation;
  • (Neo)colonialism in the contemporary Caribbean and beyond;
  • The development of national consciousness;
  • Caribbean literature;
  • Theorising decolonisation;
  • Visions of a post-colonial future.

Please send abstracts of no more than 250 words, by Friday 17th March, to decolconference@gmail.com <decolconference@gmail.com>*

Keynote Speaker: Prof Matthew Smith (University of the West Indies, Mona).

Guest Speakers: Prof.Tina K. Ramnarine (Royal Holloway, University of London) Dr William ‘Lez’ Henry (University of West London).

Convenors: Jack Webb and William Tantam (Institute of Latin American Studies)

Maria del Pilar Kaladeen (Centre for Postcolonial Studies).

In association with AHRC Translating Cultures Theme. Supported by the Society for Latin American Studies

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